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Opinion by Michael Royster

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – The voters of the United States have spoken, and the American heartland has elected a man seemingly without a heart. As Dorothy said to Toto: “I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas any more.”

Michael Royster, aka The Curmudgeon.
Michael Royster, aka The Curmudgeon.

How did this come to pass? How did a man once regarded as a blustering buffoon by politicians, pundits and pollsters, manage to pull off the most astonishing upset in American political history?

The short answer is that Donald Trump, the Manhattan billionaire, had a far better feel for the political pulse of the people than did any of the candidates he vanquished. He perceived that the resentment felt by people in “flyover country” against those who live on America’s East and West coasts was both deep and broad.

So Trump focussed on “the forgotten man”, and that phrase resonated with tens of millions of voters. “Make America great again” was a call to return to the 1950’s of President Eisenhower and the 1980’s of President Reagan. It was a call to get off the political merry-go-round that had foisted Bush and Clinton dynasties upon government.

Trump ran against the American Establishment, represented by imperial Presidents Bush the First, Clinton the First, Bush the Second and wannabe Clinton the Second. He also ran against President Obama, portrayed as no more than a stalking horse for the Clintons.

Having adopted this “disestablishmentarian” strategy, Trump’s tactic, in poker terms, was to go “all in”; he repeatedly “bet the farm” and he won. Those who cringed at the strategy and the tactics, believing they would end in disaster for him, were proven wrong.

Trump’s vision of the American electorate was, from beginning to end, more insightful than those of any of us—including the Curmudgeon.

The Curmudgeon did not predict the election results, nor will he predict a negative future for the United States until he sees whether President Trump actually has a heart.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. This avid reader of the Curmudgeon would like to know who will play Scarecrow and Tin Man to Trump’s Lion in search of his heart?

    As a Gary Johnson voter who did not like either of the main candidates, Trump actually has a great deal of administrative experience running his real estate empire. His negotiation skills (read “Art of the Deal” – I have not) are honed and could serve him well in foreign policy negotiations, especially when he does the unexpected. I just hope he doesn’t push the big red button out of frustration, and nuke us all!

    PS – I wanted to vote for change, and even wanted to vote for Trump in a way. However, I could not in good confidence, put a validation on Mr. Trump and his style when I voted.

  2. I would just like to point out that the majority of Americans did not vote for this man.

    A small point, but all that I am left with as I stand on the outside looking in.

  3. Trump also won because a lot of this country is as bigoted as he is. This is the white man’s attempt to make a last stand against the growing diversity in this country. I’m glad I live in California where such diversity is celebrated most of the time and fought for all of the time. Sadly, America’s Electoral College, not the majority of its people, has elected its first dictator and bigot.

  4. Trump won because we are fed up with the Politically Correct, Namby-pamby, Snowflake attitudes of people like the three previous posters above. My bet is, they all voted for the worst President in the history of the USA – B H Obama – twice. We’re mad as hell, and we’re not going to take it anymore. We voted and still maintain the House of Representatives, the Senate, Governors, local offices throughout the land for the past two cycles and NOW – the Presidency. Now you know how we felt re-electing Obama – except we accepted it and did not riot. Jerks.

  5. Jim: I agree with some of the reasons stated by Chris; however, it is more than that. Clinton was a horrible candidate and many liberals saw her as a lessor of two evils. The money pumped into the Clinton Foundation by Arab Nations and others currying for favor disgusted many voters. I voted for local candidates, but I could not vote for any of the presidential candidates despite the fact that I disliked Clinton more than Trump. I couldn’t vote for a lesser of two evils. The Left Wing disgusted many U.S. citizens and the mass media in the USA disgusted them even more, because they couldn’t report the news without bias. I voted for Obama twice. Why? Because I believed that electing a black president would improve race relations in the USA. Boy, was I incorrect. BLM protests against police officers pissed me off, and his kowtowing to the UN about bringing in tens of thousands of Muslims without vetting them, scared the hell out of a lot of people, when it took only dozen to take down the Twin Towers in NYC.

  6. No Chris, I did not go for Obama. You’re right about one thing which Alden is incorrect about. The election was about money and not race. People are being forced to compete in the global economy, but are not being welcomed in the global community because they are having their lives destroyed by the global economy and no one wants to hear about it on the coasts. You’re right. People are mad, myself included. I’m a midwesterner. I’m self employed. My family comes from family farming. I know what the early 1980’s were like. They were rough. The good times haven’t returned because not one administration has had the seeds to fight socialism since Reagan. If you like socialism, I give you the USSR, post-Weimar Germany (hmmmm started a big war in ’39), Cuba, and Venezuela as great arguments against it. We probably agree on more than you would like to admit, but if you don’t treat people with class, you’ll never make it to the place you think you personally deserve to be. Alden, as for you, go walk a farm field in South Dakota or Iowa some day, engage in conversation with people who work manual labor to feed the world, and then you can decide if the USA is as prejudiced as you think it is.

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