U.S. detects cases of “Havana syndrome” in Colombian embassy officials

The U.S. Department of State has referred to the events as "unexplained health incidents" or UHIs, while the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director has publicly called them attacks.

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - The U.S. Government has confirmed that more than a dozen people linked to the Embassy in Colombia have suffered symptoms of what is known as "Havana syndrome", an allusion to the events that were first detected in the Cuban capital.

The controversy dates back to Cuba at the end of 2016 and, since then, victims have also been detected in countries such as Russia and China. U.S. President Joe Biden signed a law last week that aims to support the victims, who suffer symptoms including headaches, memory loss, or nausea.

Colombia has now joined . . .

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