Scientists in Chile discover remains of plant-eating dinosaur amid world´s driest desert

The discovery of a titanosaur on the west side of South America’s Andes Mountains is rare, though several species have been found in Argentina and Brazil, further east.

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - Scientists in Chile’s parched Atacama desert, the world’s driest, have discovered the remains of a previously unknown species of dinosaur that millions of years ago lived among lush greenery in what is now a moonscape of rock and sand.

A team led by Chilean geologist Carlos Arévalo unearthed the remains of Arackar licanantay, which means “Atacama bones” in the Kunza language, 75 kilometers south of the desert city of Copiapó. The so-called titanosaur had a small head and long neck and tail, as well as an unusually flat back, compared with others . . .

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