[uam_ad id="317182"]

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - The coronavirus crisis has generated platitudes at the same rate that it destroys others, deeply rooted in the economic imaginary: while the "unprecedented" is used as a crutch for everything, the mantra that pandemics reduce inequalities falters.

Not because it is wrong in itself - it proved right during the black plague in the 14th century, and, to a lesser extent, in the 1918 flu epidemic, particularly among younger workers - but because this time the circumstances do not allow it to be so. In the past, the pandemic spread most among the working-age population, reducing available . . .

To read the full NEWS and much more, Subscribe to our Premium Membership Plan. Already Subscribed?