In Latin America, Chile and Paraguay lead in perceptions of inequality in access to health, education and justice

According to the study, Costa Rica, Uruguay and Nicaragua are the only countries where a lower level of inequity is perceived in health, education, and justice.

most significant, In Latin America, Chile and Paraguay lead in perceptions of inequality in access to health, education and justice

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – Latinobarómetro’s opinion survey is the first to measure Latin Americans’ perceptions of access to health, education, and justice. Chile and Paraguay top the list of countries where people perceive the most significant inequity in accessing these essential services.

Chile is the country in the region that perceives the most significant inequity in access to education, justice, and health, at 90% or higher. Paraguay is second, with a rate of more than 80% in all three areas, according to the 2020 Annual Report released Thursday.

In Latin America, Chile and Paraguay lead in perceptions of inequality in access to health, education and justice
In Latin America, Chile and Paraguay lead in perceptions of inequality in access to health, education and justice. (Photo internet reproduction)

According to the study, Costa Rica, Uruguay and Nicaragua are the only countries where a lower level of inequity is perceived in health, education, and justice.

Regarding the perceived increase in corruption, Chile (73%) tops the list of countries that perceive an increase in this scourge, followed by Venezuela with 75%, Ecuador (72%), and Paraguay and Peru (70%).

The study also mentions that in Paraguay, 84% agree with the protests and intend to protest for access to health and education, for wage increases and better working conditions, and against grievances and corruption.

The regional survey was conducted in 18 countries, including Venezuela and Nicaragua. The report is titled Adiós Macondo (Goodbye Macondo). Its summary argues that governance in Latin American and Caribbean countries is in flux and predicts difficult times for the region.

“No people in the region are satisfied with the way democracy works in their country. More than 30 years after the transitions, democracies have consolidated with increasing imperfections and stagnant states,” the document states.

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