By Jay Forte, Contributing Reporter

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – The delegation of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) of the Organization of American States (OAS) arrived in Brazil today (Monday November 5th), and will be here through the 12th to observe urban and rural areas in eight states, according to government news agency, Agencia Brasil.

The President of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, Margaret May Macaulay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Brazil News
The President of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, Margaret May Macaulay, photo by the Government of Guatemala.

The delegation is headed by committee chairwoman, Margarette May Macaulay, a citizen of Jamaica and was elected as Commissioner on June 16, 2015, by the OAS General Assembly. Also included in the group are the first vice-president, Esmeralda Arosemena de Troitiño, commissioners Francisco José Eguiguren Praeli, Joel Hernández García and Antonia Urrejola Noguera, rapporteur for Brazil.

During their visit, the commission’s representatives will first go to Brasília, then to Minas Gerais, Maranhão, Roraima, Pará, Mato Grosso do Sul, Bahia, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. They will meet with members of human rights organizations as well as federal, state and municipal governments.

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States monitors and analyzes all issues related to the area in the 35-member countries. Venezuela, Nicaragua and Brazil have received special attention from the group in recent months.

The topics that have been most frequently mentioned are the flight of immigrants from Venezuela, the difficulties they face and the political and social tension in Nicaragua as a result of the continuous conflicts provoked by demonstrations contrary to the government of President Daniel Ortega.

In the case of Brazil, the murders of the councilwoman Marielle Franco (PSOL-RJ) and the driver Anderson Pedro Andrade in March of this year, still unsolved were mentioned in several occasions. In August, the commission recommended adopting protective measures to Marielle’s family and her widow, Monica Benicio.

Last week, Public Security Minister Raul Jungmann announced that, following guidance from the Attorney General’s Office, the Marielle and Anderson case will be investigated by the Federal Police. The initiative generated reactions among delegates of the Civil Police, accused of politicizing the process.

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